LTL 101: Pick-ups and Deliveries

LTL 101: Pick-ups and Deliveries

1 month ago 0

This week we are covering some of our top tips for easy, efficient, and cost-effective pick-up and delivery tips. Pick-Ups: Any pick-up (P/U) entered after 2:30 PM local time should be called into the carrier to insure availability, otherwise the request will roll over to the next day Lift Gate P/Us must be called into the carriers because Lift Gates are not readily available at every terminal All Container Freight Stations and Airline P/Us require Delivery Order and Entry paperwork (3416 document), these need to be sent 24 hours in advance because drivers will need these documents in hand prior to P/U P/Us are not Guaranteed All carriers require a 2 hour window for P/Us P/Us are done in the afternoon because drivers have to deliver freight before they can start pickups If your shipper needs an AM P/U it is best practice to call the carrier to set something up

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LTL 101: Delivery Expectations & PODs

1 month ago 0

Last Blog we discussed educating our shippers in order to ensure our BOL is set up correctly and to avoid a possible dispute with the carrier regarding our invoice. This week we want to discuss educating our consignees so they know what to expect at the time of delivery. It is very important to educate your consignee BEFORE the freight is delivered about what the process will be like. Will they need a liftgate? Will the driver be helping unload the freight in any form or manner? By asking these questions in advance, and by making sure that the consignee and you are on the same page, you can minimize additional charges on your invoice. On the delivery receipt/proof of delivery (POD), issues should be noted if you suspect that the value of the product has been compromised. Make sure to note any damage to the packaging, and/or missing product. Having

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Training Tuesday: Preparation Before the Sales Call

2 months ago 0

How many times have you been confronted by a salesperson that knows nothing about you or your business? Did they launch into a barrage of “situation” questions and expect you to answer all of them? Or, worse yet, the salesperson didn’t ask any questions, but instead jumped right into their presentation about something that you have no interest in. Unfortunately, that kind of sales technique is the norm, not the exception. Preparation before the sales call is critical. Knowledge is power. You should know as much as you can about your service, your industry, your competitors, and your competitors’ strengths and weaknesses. You should also learn as much as possible about your prospective client before you make contact with them. Below are four basic elements of successful sales preparation: Know the industry. Technology and trends are rapidly changing and new services are being offered continuously. Read industry specific publications, websites,

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LTL 101: BOL Basics

2 months ago 0

This week revisits educating our shippers in order to ensure our BOL is set up correctly and to avoid possible disputes with the carrier regarding our invoice. Did you know LTL carriers employ “weight & inspection coordinators” whose sole responsibility is to catch the “bad guys” who list an inaccurate weight or class on their BOL? They keep an eye out for any shipments whose description on the BOL doesn’t seem to match up with its appearance. They will physically examine your freight, and if they deem it necessary to inspect the contents or check the weight, they’ll issue an inspection certificate. You will foot the bill for the additional inspection. It is for this reason we need to make sure our shippers understand the follow: It is imperative to make sure the weight and class on the BOL are accurate. Don’t just guess, and don’t try to be sneaky,

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Training Tuesday: Building to the Sale

2 months ago 0

A good initial approach to a prospective customer is a crucial part of the sales presentation. All the selling skills in the world won’t matter if you don’t get your foot in the door. A lot of salespeople tend to beat around the bush, differentiate yourself by stating your name, the company you represent, and the particular transportation services you’re there to sell, right away. Capitalize on this introduction by beginning concept selling. Tell the prospect “I’d like to share an idea with you. I’m in the transportation business. I’m assuming you’re always looking for ideas that will make your company’s shipping and receiving processes more efficient and profitable.” This statement opens the door to your sell and informs the customer that you’re there to add value. It creates interest and you have to substantiate the statement in your presentation. Early in your initial meeting be sure to mention the

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Training Tuesday: Mentors and Joint Sales

2 months ago 0

Mentors are an important part of becoming a successful salesperson. A mentor or helper could be a co-worker, manager, or someone in a similar field. Find a mentor who can offer advice, tips, experience and suggestions for improving your sales skills. Here’s a short list of our tips for getting the most from a relationship with a mentor: Brainstorm. Sometimes you get so immersed in a sale that you can’t see the forest for the trees. Some of the best ideas and proven sales techniques come from a simple conversation. Open the conversation with a simple comment like, “Tell me about your best sales call,” or, “What do you say on a sales call that always seems to work?” Have a game plan. Based on your personal styles, or the nature of a particular sale, determine in advance the roles that you and your partner will play in each sales

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LTL 101: Reconsignment

2 months ago 0

Reconsignment – Here’s a shipping term that you might be familiar with if you’ve ever had a change of plans with your freight. A reconsignment happens when freight that is already in transit is re-directed from one delivery location to another. The charges associated with this can vary based on how far apart the delivery locations are. For instance, if the new location is just down the street, the charge will probably be minimal. However, if freight was heading to California and is being reconsigned to Florida, you will be in for a hefty reconsignment fee. We get a lot of groans when we have to quote people for the cost of a reconsignment so we wanted to highlight the process so you can educate your customers as well: 1.We have to send written authorization to make the change to the carrier. A Bill of Lading is a legal contract, so any changes

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LTL 101: Drop Trailers

3 months ago 0

From time to time you may run into a drop trailer with one of your LTL shipments. A drop trailer is a trailer that is left at a location for an indeterminate amount of time. It’s “dropped,” and picked up later. Most of the time, a drop trailer is used at locations that ship or receive often enough to fill up or unload a full trailer in a week or even a day, depending on production. The location doesn’t matter as much as the amount of freight that is moving in or out of the specified location and the agreement in place with each LTL carrier. Think about it like this: Let’s say you have a shipment going to a warehouse that multiple manufacturers ship to as well. This warehouse has pre-established relationships with a handful of LTL carriers. In order to save time and money they will consolidate and

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Training Tuesday – Silence and Sales Listening

3 months ago 0

Often the most important part of your sales pitch is when you are completely silent. We often rush through all the great benefits of why a customer would buy, without really listening to them tell us what they need…why they might buy from us. Silence is often uncomfortable and we feel the need to fill the space, but silence is often one of the most important pieces of the sales puzzle. It’s not what we say that makes the sale, it’s what we can get the prospect to say. Begin with Questions Think about how many times you launch right into your presentation thinking you know what the prospect wants. Sometime later, often too much later, you find you’re on the wrong track. The prospect has an entirely different need – one you might have uncovered by asking open-ended questions that required more than a yes or no response. Then

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LTL 101: Shipping Hazardous Materials

3 months ago 0

The U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has specific rules for shipping hazardous materials. SunteckTTS can help you determine the DOT hazardous class for your shipment and find contract freight carriers that meet DOT safety and transportation requirements. Hazardous materials are defined by the U. S. Department of Transportation in accordance with the Federal Hazardous Material Law regulations. A DOT hazardous material classification is applied if a material, in a particular amount and form, poses an unreasonable risk to health, safety or property. Below is the list of DOT hazard classes: DOT Hazard Class 1: Explosives. Division 1.1: Explosives with a mass explosion hazard Division 1.2: Explosives with a projection hazard Division 1.3: Explosives with predominantly a fire hazard Division 1.4: Explosives with no significant blast hazard Division 1.5: Very insensitive explosives Division 1.6: Extremely insensitive explosive articles DOT Hazard Class 2: Gases. Division 2.1: Flammable gases Division 2.2: Non-flammable gases Division

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